MULTINATIONALS

media freedom

I think one of the most fundamental issues that lies before us is the freedom of the Media.

We can by no means talk about democracy when there is no freedom of the media.

And I do not believe for one moment that the mass media as it exists at present, basically dominated by certain conglomerations of power, is free.

If fact we have gone further down to road to mass control, where as in recent events, we see the Pentagon controlling the flow of information, for example in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Do we really realize how serious this situation is?

ABC has 225 affiliates, 21 radio stations. etc. 

Michael Eisner - Chair of Disney. Paid $10 Billion

The World's Entertainment Super Power

ABC Sports Global Network goes to 135 countries.

The Media Circus.

Creationist Theories.

"The Money-changers are swarming through the Temples of Democracy." CNN.

Jane Fonda was called a "God damm enviromentalist hippy bitch, eco-pornographer, communist."


MULTINATIONALS

Ministry of Culture? The state does fund ‘culturet but only in an unfair proportion of classical ballets, such as ‘Swan Lake’, opera and the usual symphony orchestras. A people’s theatre, from street or grass root level is totally unheard of — except where union organisationS are using theatre to educate the workers.

Multinational corporations do make money available, but the creative and credible circuits avoid this money like the plague — and this has been adopted by groups such as the ‘Culture and Resistance Festiva1 in Botswana, the Community Arts Project in Cape Town etc. For instance, the Ford Foundation financed a series of ‘RoadShows’ for the People’s Space in Cape Town, which were boycotted in black ghettoes. One is dealing with a mass that are more politically aware than the ruling elite. Thus in another way, groups of ‘avant garde’ creators are cut off from any form of patronage both from the state or the so—called ‘private sector’. Commercial and conservative, theatre managements are concerned only with ‘putting bums on seats’, the result being an ongoing regression with shows like ‘Gigi’, ‘South Pacific’, ‘Annie Get Your Gun’, ‘The King and I’ and so on. The Baxter Theatre in Cape Town, which is managed through a Foundation grant, given to the University of Cape Town and the Market Theatre in Johannesburg, air some new playwrights —often of difficult racial and social problems — but the surface is only scraped and never are the raw issues dealt with. The final and most damning example is the total lack of a South African cinema of any content.